My First Blog Post

  • By K WILBY
  • 12 Jan, 2017

In our blog we will try to bring to you new information and ideas from the transport industry. Our new website has only just been published today, so some things may need tweaking, if you see anything not quiet right on the website please let us know.

We are currently working on our e-store and hope to have it up and running on the website in the very near future.

Please take a tour round our website and let us know your thoughts on it

AK Fleet Solution's Transport Blog

By K WILBY 25 Apr, 2017
The calculations of the fines relating to speeding offences have changed and came into effect on the 24th April 2017.
There are now three bands based on the recorded speed above the speed limit inforce. The bands dictate the severity of the fine/endorsement / disqualification.

Speeding (Revised 2017)
Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984, s.89(1)
Effective from: 24 April 2017
 Maximum: Level 3 fine (level 4 if motorway)
Offence range: Band A fine – Band C fine
User guide for this offence

Steps 1 and 2 – Determining the offence seriousness

The starting point applies to all offenders irrespective of plea or previous convictions.

Speed limit (mph) Recorded speed (mph)
20 41 and above 31 – 40 21 – 30
30 51 and above 41 – 50 31 – 40
40 66 and above 56 – 65 41 – 55
50 76 and above 66 – 75 51 – 65
60 91 and above 81 – 90 61 – 80
70 101 and above 91 – 100 71 – 90
Sentencing range Band C fine Band B fine

Band A fine


Points/disqualification Disqualify 7 – 56 days OR 6 points Disqualify 7 – 28
days OR  4 – 6 points
3 points

  • Must endorse and may disqualify . If no disqualification impose 3 – 6 points
  • Where an offender is driving grossly in excess of the speed limit the court should consider a disqualification in excess of 56 days.
Band ranges

Starting point Range
Fine Band A  50% of relevant weekly income  25 – 75% of relevant weekly income
Fine Band B  100% of relevant weekly income  75 – 125% of relevant weekly income
Fine Band C  150% of relevant weekly income 125 – 175% of relevant weekly income
Fine Band D  250% of relevant weekly income 200 – 300% of relevant weekly income
Fine Band E 400% of relevant weekly income 300 – 500% of relevant weekly income
Fine Band F  600% of relevant weekly income

 500 – 700% of relevant weekly income


The court should then consider further adjustment for any aggravating or mitigating factors. The following is a non-exhaustive list of additional factual elements providing the context of the offence and factors relating to the offender. Identify whether any combination of these, or other relevant factors, should result in an upward or downward adjustment from the sentence arrived at so far.


Factors increasing seriousness

Statutory aggravating factors:

  • Previous convictions, having regard to a) the nature of the offence to which the conviction relates and its relevance to the current offence; and b) the time that has elapsed since the conviction
  • Offence committed whilst on bail

Other aggravating factors:

  • Offence committed on licence or post sentence supervision
  • Poor road or weather conditions
  • Driving LGV, HGV, PSV etc.
  • Towing caravan/trailer
  • Carrying passengers or heavy load
  • Driving for hire or reward
  • Evidence of unacceptable standard of driving over and above speed
  • Location e.g. near school
  • High level of traffic or pedestrians in the vicinity

Factors reducing seriousness or reflecting personal mitigation

  • No previous convictions or no relevant/recent convictions
  • Good character and/or exemplary conduct
  • Genuine emergency established


Full details of the above scales can be found at

https://www.sentencingcouncil.org.uk/offences/item/speeding-revised-2017/

Professional drivers should note that the figures stated in the above bands are starting points and the courts can increase these fines based on the type of vehicle being driven and the way it was driven


By K WILBY 17 Jan, 2017

As a driver of an HGV or PCV vehicle, just minor offences, like speeding,  committed whilst driving their own car could have implications on their vocational licence.  It is a requirement that drivers notify their employers and also the Traffic Commissioner's area office of any changes to their licence. This would include any infringements e.g.  endorsements and suspensions. Companies should ensure that they have systems in place to check their employees licence details. It is not now acceptable practice just to take a photocopy of a driver's licence, they must use either the DVLA's or a licence checking bureau's electronic checking systems to ensure that their drivers have a valid licence to driver the category of vehicle the employer is asking them to drive. Please contact AK Fleet Solutions directly if you would like details of these services.

The DVLA, in association with the Dft and trade associations,  has produced a number of handy guidance notes to help vocational (HGV & PCV) drivers understand the complex strict rules regarding driving HGV & PCV vehicles as part of their occupation.

The guidance covers a range of subject, which drivers need to be aware of, these include;

  • Driver conduct
  • The Traffic Commissioner and their powers their role in the industry
  • The Certificate of Professional Competence (CPC)
  • Tachographs, including the use of and driver's hours rules and regs.
  • Driver's Daily Walk Round Checks
  • Driver & Medical Licensing

    

By K WILBY 14 Jan, 2017

The Senior Traffic Commissioner's statutory guidance and statutory directions has been revised

 

The outgoing Senior Traffic Commissioner (STC) Mrs Beverley Bell, along with all the regional Traffic Commissioners (TC’s) have always encouraged operators to be aware of and understand the Statutory Guidance documents.

 

Whilst the clear majority of operators will never appear before a TC, all should be aware of these documents. You might ask, “what are they?” “I have enough to read and I am too busy to read endless documents” These documents are Statutory Guidance Directions which are issued to TC’s and they govern their actions when dealing with operators and vocational drivers.

 

The STC has revised these documents with effect from the 3rd January 2017, the clear majority of the changes in this revision are minor, but operators should be aware of the changes to the Competence of a Transport Manager (TM), the period of grace to operate without a TM and also the use of the Welsh language in cases where the “individual parties” are resident in Wales  

 

Full details of these Statutory Guidance & Statutory Directions can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/senior-traffic-commissioners-statutory-guidance-and-statutory-directions

If any operators, transport managers or vocational drivers, would like further clarification or advise on these documents please contact us. We are only too willing to help where we can  

By K WILBY 12 Jan, 2017

In our blog we will try to bring to you new information and ideas from the transport industry. Our new website has only just been published today, so some things may need tweaking, if you see anything not quiet right on the website please let us know.

We are currently working on our e-store and hope to have it up and running on the website in the very near future.

Please take a tour round our website and let us know your thoughts on it

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